2011 July Archive

C’est pas un pays, c’est un hiver

| Filed under For discussion life on the job

A friend of ours who blogs anonymously as Invisible Man sent us this three part story about his experiences at work and beyond. It’s powerful stuff about work, class, race, and the struggle to keep on keeping on.

C’est pas un pays, c’est un hiver

The Suit Shop

It was late in the afternoon and the sweaty, noisy, humid factory day was almost finished.

It was bitterly cold outside, but you wouldn’t know it from the inside of the suit factory. And you could easily forget that it was winter, because at Men’s Clothiers International where I worked, there were no windows to the outside. But 2003, my first winter in Montreal, was one of the coldest winters on record. (more…)

by recomposition | tags : | 3

Sometimes We Don’t Even Get to the Point of Losing

| Filed under life on the job Our writings

In this piece, Juan Conatz talks about some of his experiences on the job.

Sometimes We Don’t Even Get to the Point of Losing…
by Juan Conatz

Reading The American Worker and old Italian operaismo surveys of auto workers, it occurred to me that it would be worth documenting some of my own experiences in wage labor. We often forget how powerful and important first person accounts of what happens to us are. (more…)

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Waves of Struggle, The Winter Campaign at the Post Office in Edmonton

| Filed under life on the job Our writings

We’ve posted a lot of articles about struggles at Canada Post. In this article Phinneas Gage lays out a detailed analysis of what went on in Edmonton.

Waves of Struggle, The Winter Campaign at the Post Office in Edmonton
by Phinneas Gage

Christine braced herself, took a deep breath and then jumped up on to a mail tub and began to shout “help! help! I am being robbed.” (more…)

“What do you do for a living?”

| Filed under For discussion life on the job

In this article our friend Frank walks us through his job in a way that gets at the bigger picture.

“What do you do for a living?”
by Frank Edgewick

At a party, someone asks, “What do you do for a living?” I answer, “Get yelled at by wealthy people.” The answer is rehearsed and so automatic that I usually forget that it makes people laugh in surprise. It is a perfectly accurate response. (more…)

by recomposition | tags : | 8